[ Socialistisk Arbejderavis nr. 369 ]
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Der blev fundet 34 artikler

Fra Socialist Review nr. 379

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Socialist Rewiew 379: Content

379

3

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Exhibition: The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

379

2

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In this touring exhibition curator Mark Leckey seeks to explore some of the ways in which modern technology comes to life.

 

Socialist Rewiew 379: Editorial

379

3

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Mark Thomas: Small island, big crisis

379

4

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At the time of writing it is still unclear whether Cyprus’s banks will finally re-open. What has taken place on this small island state seems part of a by now familiar pattern of financial speculation, real estate boom and resulting collapse of a banking sector – one that had ballooned to around eight times the size of the economy it was attached to.

 

John Davies: Hands off our bedrooms

379

4

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“Good morning, what a relief it was to see your leaflet come through my letterbox. Thank you.” It has not been often that we get that response to the campaigning work we do.

 

Buckingham Palace by numbers

379

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Number og guest bedrooms – 52
Amount the Queen will pay in Bedroom Tax – £0
Data taken from The Official Website of the British Monarchy

 

Saying no to Zimbabwe’s constitution

379

6

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Socialist Review spoke to Tafadzwa Choto of the International Socialist Organisation in Zimbabwe about the significance of the recent referendum on a new constitution.

 

Rob Ferguson: Feedback: Lessons in class

379

8

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In my September article on the impact of tuition fees and university funding (Class Barriers, Socialist Review, September 2012) I noted that “the increase in fees has not immediately translated into a disproportionate fall in applications from the poorest school leavers as many predicted”.

 

Colin Wilson: Feedback: The real spirit of ‘45

379

8

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Ken Loach has made many great socialist films, but after seeing The Spirit of ‘45 I left the cinema feeling uneasy (Culture, March 2013, Socialist Review).

 

Mariya Ivancheva: Global protest movements: First steps in Bulgaria

379

9

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In the last week of February, after days of protests across the country, the Bulgarian government headed by Boyko Borisov resigned. Mariya Ivancheva looks at what happened and what comes next.

 

Ron Margulies: All change in Turkey

379

10

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Turkey’s ruling Islamic AKP party has been committed to neoliberalism and expanding Turkey’s regional influence. But, argues Roni Margulies, there has also been a major reshaping of the relationship between society, the state and the once all powerful Turkish military.

 

Mark Thomas: Marx and morals

379

14

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What does Marxism say about ethics? Mark L Thomas argues that Marx had a coherent theory of ethics that can overcome the contradictions of bourgeois morality, which is the subject of a new book by Paul Blackledge.

 

Keith Flett: A class that made itself

379

16

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Socialist historian E P Thompson’s classic book The Making of the English Working Class was first published 50 years ago. Keith Flett takes a look at this seminal work of labour history that placed workers at the centre of making their own history.

 

Estelle Cooch + Rafel Sanchis: Strikes, independence and indignados

379

18

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Rafel Sanchis and Estelle Cooch spoke to David Fernández, an MP for the Catalan parliament, about the origins and politics of the anti-capitalist coalition, CUP, and its relationship to the wider movement.

 

Ayodele Jabbar: Obituary: Chinua Achebe (1930-2013)

379

21

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The death of Chinua Achebe leads Ayodele Jabbar to recall the lagacy of literature he left behind.

 

Michael Roberts: What’s wrong with the Keynesian answer to austerity?

379

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As austerity measures bite while the economy continues to flatline, arguments for a Keynesian response to the recession are gaining traction. Marxist economist Michael Roberts casts a critical eye over the Keynesian case, arguing that it misunderstands the causes of capitalist crisis.

 

Estelle Cooch: Book Review: Everyday Revolutions

379

25

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Marina Sitrin: Everyday Revolutions, Zed books, £14.99
On the nights of the 19th and 20th of December 2001 hundreds of thousands of Argentinians joined what became known as the “cacerolazo”.

 

Xanthe Whittaker: Book Review: Murdoch’s Politics

379

26

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David McKnight: Murdoch’s Politics, Pluto Press, £12.99
Murdoch and, at least, the British arm of his News Corporation, have been utterly disgraced over the phone hacking scandal, which revealed the corruption that went from the top of the Murdoch empire to the heart of the British establishment.

 

Shanice McBean: The Childhood of Jesus

379

26

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JM Coetzee: The Childhood of Jesus, Harvill Secker, £16.99
The novel begins with Simón, a middle aged man, arriving in a propertyless, minimalist new land accompanied by a young boy called David. In the land from which they are travelling David lost his parents and Simón, a stranger, makes it his job to find the child’s mother.

 

Sarah Ensor: Book Review: Feeding Frenzy

379

27

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Paul McMahon: Feeding Frenzy, Profile Books, £12.99
Feeding Frenzy asks whether we can feed the ten billion people projected to be alive in 2100 or will the environment collapse and kill us all? The good thing about the book is that it is essentially optimistic. It doesn’t fall prey to the racist arguments of the new Malthusians who start from the idea that poor, usually brown, people have too many children.

 

Rebecca Short: Book Review: Latin America’s Turbulent Transitions

379

27

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Roger Burbach, Michael Fox and Federico Fuentes: Latin America’s Turbulent Transitions, Zed Books, £16.99
Following the death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez at the beginning of March, the authors make a timely contribution to the discussion about the future of the left in the region.

 

Ron Senchak: Book Review: Raising Expectations (And Raising Hell)

379

28

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Jane McAlevey, Raising Expectations (And Raising Hell), Verso, £20
This is one very angry trade union activist and this is a very angry book. This is a personal record of her ten years organising for the union and documents her struggle within it. It is not easy for a union to be recognised in the US. There are many hurdles to climb, all with the interests of the employers in mind. On top of this the use of union busting firms is widespread there. They specialise in stopping unions being formed and have proven very effective.

 

John Newsinger: Book Review: The Circus

379

28

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James Craig: The Circus, C R Crime, £7.99
James Craig’s first Inspector Carlyle novel, London Calling, had a killer bumping off the former members of a particularly nasty posh boys’ Oxford University Bullingdon-style dining club, the Merrion Club.

 

Simon Englert: Classic read: Tell Me How Long the Train’s Been Gone

379

29

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James Baldwin: Tell Me How Long the Train’s Been Gone (First published in 1968)
It is no easy task choosing a classic read from James Baldwin’s long list of novels, essays and plays. It is tempting to choose Baldwin himself (or his biography at least) as the classic read. Baldwin is one of the most fascinating figures of the US civil rights movement.

 

New in Paperback and Children’s Books

379

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Harvey: Rebel Cities – Buhle: Marxism in the United States – Grant: Fear – Donaldson: Animal Music

 

Anindya Bhattacharyya: Reviews: Duchamp, Lichtenstein and pop art

379

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Two galleries in central London are currently hosting exhibitions devoted to major 20th century artists. The Barbican’s show, entitled The Bride and the Bachelors, focuses on the work of pioneering French artist Marcel Duchamp. Meanwhile the Tate Modern has unveiled its latest blockbuster, a retrospective devoted to the Pop Art paintings of Roy Lichtenstein.

 

John Sinha: Film Review: Promised Land

379

31

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Gus Van Sant: Promised Land
Steve Butler is an up and coming leasing agent for Global Crosspower Solutions. In the opening scene in an opulent restaurant Crosspower’s chief financial officer boasts that the company is worth $9 billion.

 

Anthony Killick: Film Review: Secret City

379

32

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Michael Chanan, Lee Salter: Secret City
Following its premier in the UK parliament, Secret City, a new feature length documentary about the City of London and the corporation that runs it, was screened to a sell-out crowd of 150 people in The Watershed, Bristol.

 

Jonny Jones: Exhibition: David Bowie Is

379

32

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Victoria and Albert Museum, London
The new “David Bowie Is” exhibition at the V&A Museum is a fascinating insight into one of one of the most contradictory figures in popular culture over the last 50 years.

 

Estelle Cooch: Music Review: Moving in the Dark

379

33

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Dizraeli and the Small Gods: Moving in the Dark
When Public Enemy implored the world to “Fight the Power” they probably never dreamed they would go on to inspire hip hop about jaffa cakes. Nor would they have ever imagined such hip hop would be any good.

 

Five things to see this month

379

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Exhibitions: Thrashed – Ice Age Art: Arrival of the Modern Mind – The Low Road – Children of the Sun – Fabrice Hyber: Raw Materials

 

Ben Windsor: TV Review: Boss

379

34

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Boss, a US TV drama that has just premiered in Britain, focuses on the political manoeuverings of the Mayor of Chicago and his opponents. But it smacks more of The Sopranos than the West Wing, with a bit of King Lear thrown in. It is a portrait of the politician as a gangster and of the gangster as tragic hero.

 

#bestoftheweb

379

34

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New left project: Zombie Films & Climate ChangeJohn Molyneux: Erik and the ZeitgeistChristopher Caudwell: Reality (MIA)Eva Dadrian on Tuareg people

 

Jack Farmer: Why read Socialism: Utopian and Scientific?

379

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Freidrich Engels’ pamphlet, Socialism: Utopian and Scientific, summarised – and criticised – some of the most sophisticated thinkers to reject the cruelty of the Industrial Revolution and argue for a different way of organising society.

 

Der blev fundet 34 artikler

< Nr. 378 –– Nr. 380 >

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www.socialister.dk – 13. november 2019 kl. 08:43