[ Irish Marxist Review nr. 5 ]
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Der blev fundet 15 artikler

Fra Irish Marxist Review (Irland) nr. 5

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Irish Marxist Review 2013 Vol 2 Number 5

5

 

mar 13

 

Content

 

John Molyneux: Irish Marxist Review Team and Contacts

5

1

mar 13

 

Irish Marxist Review is published in association with the Socialist Workers Party (Ireland), but articles express the opinions of individual authors unless otherwise stated. We welcome proposals for articles and reviews for IMR. If you have a suggestion please phone or email as above.
Alt. url: PDF

 

John Molyneux: Contributors (Irish Marxist Review 2013 Vol 2 Number 5)

5

1

mar 13

 


Alt. url: PDF

 

John Molyneux: Editorial (Irish Marxist Review 2013 Vol 2 Number 5)

5

2

mar 13

 

This issue of Irish Marxist Review begins with a focus on two key events in Irish history – the 1913 Lockout and the 1916 Rising – and then moves on to consider how different legacies of that history, Loyalism and Dissident Republicanism are manifesting themselves in Northern Ireland today.
Alt. url: PDF

 

Paul O’Brien: 1913 The Great Lockout: A Survey

5

5

mar 13

 

The 1913 lockout was a pivotal moment in Irish history. This essay will present a survey of the literature published to date on the lockout. These publications together provide us with an important archive documenting and analysing the social and political context of 1913, while at the same time examining the key strategic positions and events leading up to and surrounding the lockout. They also provide us with a valuable insight into the political men that were Jim Larkin and James Connolly.

 

Conor Kostick: James Connolly in The Bureau of Military History

5

15

mar 13

 

The Bureau of Military History was established by the Irish government in 1947 with the remit of interviewing activists from the period 1913 to 1921. The Bureau approached people through the original IRA brigade structures, from there word of mouth led them to members at all levels of the Volunteer movement. The result is an archive collection with over 1,700 contributions, including witness statements from rank and file members whose testimony is otherwise lost to history. First released in 2003, in 2012 this archive was put online at www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie

 

Colm Bryce: Back to the Armed Struggle? The Dissidents Analysed

5

25

mar 13

 

On a gable wall at the top of Westland Street, in the Bogside in Derry, a billboard was erected in 2009, shortly after Sinn Féin leader Martin McGuinness denounced the republicans who had just killed police officer Stephen Carroll in Craigavon as ‘traitors to the island of Ireland’. Illustrated with a photo of an armed British soldier, it reads: Those who administer British rule are traitors. They haven’t gone away you know Iraq, Afghanistan, Ireland.

 

Goretti Horgan: The State of Loyalism

5

46

mar 13

 

Anyone visiting the North of Ireland these days cannot drive through any city, town or hamlet there without finding part or all of it bedecked with massive union flags. From December 2012 into the early months of 2013, to the time of writing, Belfast and all of the North has seen almost daily protests about the union flag, some ending in riots; all featuring vicious sectarianism on the streets.

 

Mary Smith: The Marikana Massacre and Lessons for the Left

5

53

mar 13

 

TV coverage of the Marikana massacre had a sickening sense of Déjà vu about it; uniformed men, rifles aimed, the crack of gunfire, black bodies in the dust – Sharpeville, Soweto, iconic images of South Africa under Apartheid. But this was August 16th 2012, not the last century; the killers took their orders not from the old racist Apartheid regime of Botha or de Klerk, but from the state headed by the ‘liberators’ – the African National Congress (ANC).

 

Simon Gilbert: Crisis and Resistance in China

5

65

mar 13

 

In September last year around 2,000 workers at a Foxconn plant in Taiyuan, capital of the inland province of Shaanxi, rioted when a worker was viciously beaten by security guards. Up to 5,000 police were called in after windows were smashed and cars damaged.

 

Connor Kelly: Irish Poetry – The Changing of the Guard

5

72

mar 13

 

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap
Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge
Through living roots awaken in my head.
But I’ve no spade to follow men like them.
I had to learn this poem at school. These lines are from Digging by Seamus Heaney.

 

Elayne Harrington: Poetry: Souls’ Quench

5

80

mar 13

 

John O’Dowd: Poetry: Ace is on the Way

5

82

mar 13

 

Marnie Holborow: Review: David Harvey, Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to Urban Revolution

5

83

mar 13

 

More than one hundred cities have passed the one million mark in the last twenty years. Small villages like Shenzhen in China have become huge metropolises of 6-10 million people. Huge infrastructural projects , dams and highways, are churning up the countryside.

 

Donny Gluckstein: Feedbacks-Responses: Response to John Molyneux

5

89

mar 13

 

John Molyneux’s generous review of A People’s History of the Second World War in Irish Marxist Review 4 raises an important question which goes beyond the remit of the book: ‘what was (and is) the correct political line for socialists to take in relation to the war?’. I agree with his conclusion on this, but in reaching it he rejects the notion of two wars – an interimperialist war from above, and a people’s war (fought by resistance movements, etc.) from below. John prefers the idea of a single war.

 

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www.socialister.dk – 7. december 2019 kl. 07:53